1000 Hwy 35 North, Suite 8
Benton, AR 72019
(501) 315- 4008

Cardiac Monitoring

Cardiac monitoring is utilized when you (the patient) have symptoms of skipped, fast or what some might refer to as “missing” heartbeats. It can also be utilized when patients have dizziness. It allows anywhere from 24 hours to a month and sometimes longer of constant monitoring of the heart. The shorter monitors are returned and analyzed and the patient is followed up in the clinic by the physician. The longer monitors have the information transmitted to the monitoring center which will then relay the information to the physician. In cases of significant problems, the monitoring center has the capability of contacting the physician during non-office hours to relay the more significant heart rhythm abnormalities. When the abnormality is noted or a period of time has passed follow-up will be arranged to make a plan for further treatment or testing.

Catheter Ablation

Sometimes, the electrical flow gets blocked or travels the same path repeatedly creating a “short-circuit” that interrupts normal heart rhythm or causes the heart to beat too fast. Occasionally medications can help, however, the most effective treatment is to destroy the short-circuit. This is a catheter ablation and is just one of the terms used to describe the non-surgical procedure. The ablation is a catheter procedure that involved inserting catheters (small flexible wires) into a vessel in the groin and they are advanced into the heart. Electrical measurements are made and pinpoints the location causing the arrhythmia. Once the area is confirmed a very small amount of tissue is destroyed ending the electrical abnormality by the use of radiofrequency energy. Catheter ablation is used to treat rapid heartbeats in the upper chambers of the heart known as SVT or supraventricular tachycardia. There are also arrhythmias that can be treated in…

Pacemakers

Normally the heart’s electrical system sends signals from one of the top chambers of the heart and travels through and to the lower chambers of the heart causing a contraction and a single heartbeat. This system helps the heart pump in an efficient manner. A problem with any part of this system, either the part that sends the signal or any portion of the system downstream can cause a slow or ‘missing’ heartbeat. An artificial pacemaker may be needed to reset the heart to the right pace so the blood and oxygen are pumped to the brain and all other vital organs. Artificial pacemakers are implanted into the body usually just below the left collarbone with a wire or ‘lead’ that is guided into the heart to touch the muscle on one end and connect to the pacemaker on the other end. It is specially programmed to the individual and…

Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT)

Millions of people worldwide have a condition called congestive heart failure (CHF) and is a serious and common problem. The heart muscle is weak and doesn’t pump properly or efficiently. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can improve CHF symptoms by improving the timing of the contractions of the heart. This results in a more powerful heartbeat, pumping more blood throughout the body. The CRT uses a 2-wire pacemaker (or defibrillator) and the wires are in each of the ventricles (lower chambers) of the heart. By sending impulses at the same time the device causes the heart to beat in a more efficient manner. This type of device improves the pumping function in about 2/3 of the patients that receive this type of device. Some of the patients also need a defibrillator because in their particular case they have increased risk for dangerously fast and/or irregular heartbeats. Also a third wire can…

Wearable Cardioverter Defibrillator (WCD)

Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) occurs when there is a problem with the heart’s electrical system. The electrical system directs the heart on how and when to beat. When the heart becomes irregular or too fast it cannot pump blood effectively. This causes the person to lose consciousness from lack of blood rich oxygen to the brain and can cause death in a matter of minutes. The wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD) is an external defibrillator that is used to prevent sudden cardiac death. The WCD has 2 main pieces: 1. A light-weight vest that is worn under regular clothing and 2. A small portable unit that includes a recorder and a generator. Wires covered by tubes connect the electrodes inside the vest to the portable unit which carried ina fanny pack or should bag. It continuously monitors the heart rate and rhythm. If the monitor in the portable unit detects a…

Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (ICD)

These devices have been very successful in preventing sudden cardiac death in high-risk patients. Like a pacemaker, ICDs are implanted under the skin. Wires called leads run from the ICD to the heart, and the device monitors the heart to detect any abnormal rhythm. If a dangerous arrhythmia is detected, the ICD delivers an electrical shock to restore the heart’s normal rhythm and prevent sudden cardiac death. The ICD can also act like a pacemaker if the heart is beating too slowly.

Tilt Table Testing

Tilt table testing is a simple test that helps the doctor identify the cause of your fainting. It checks how changes in body position can affect your blood pressure and heart rate. To do this, you are placed on a table that is tilted upward. The test tries to recreate fainting symptoms while your blood pressure and heart rate are monitored. The test can be done in a hospital or at your doctor’s office. During Your Test Tilt table testing takes about 60 minutes. The testing room is kept quiet and dimly lit. During the test: Small pads (electrodes) are put on your chest to monitor your heartbeat. A blood pressure cuff is put on your arm. An IV (intravenous) line may be placed in your other arm. The IV line delivers fluids and medicine if needed. You’ll be asked to lie flat on the table. Your upper body and…

Four Ways to Deal with Stress

  Here are four simple techniques for managing stress: Positive Self-Talk Self-talk is one way to deal with stress. We all talk to ourselves; sometimes we talk out loud but usually we keep self-talk in our heads. Self-talk can be positive (“I can do this” or “Things will work out”) or negative (“I’ll never get well” or “I’m so stupid”). Negative self-talk increases stress. Positive self-talk helps you calm down and control stress. With practice, you can learn to turn negative thoughts into positive ones.For example: Negative Positive “I can’t do this.” “I’ll do the best I can.” “Everything is going wrong.” “I can handle things if I take one step at a time.” “I hate it when this happens.” “I know how to deal with this; I’ve done it before.” To help you feel better, practice positive self-talk every day — in the car, at your desk, before you…

Be Spicy not Salty

Making and sticking to healthier eating choices is easier when the food you’re choosing tastes good. Reducing sodium intake is important, but most of us depend on salt to enhance the flavor of our food. The truth is, there are plenty of seasonings out there to bring out the best in what you’re eating without reaching for the salt shaker. Here is a list of foods along with seasonings that complement them. Give them a try! BREADS: Anise, caraway seeds, cardamom, fennel, poppy seeds, sesame seeds DESSERTS: Anise, caraway seeds, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, ginger, mace, mint, nutmeg, poppy seeds ENTRÉES: Beef: Allspice, bay leaf, bell pepper, cayenne, cumin, curry powder, garlic, marjoram, mushrooms, dry mustard, nutmeg, onion, rosemary, sage, thyme, wine Pork: Apple, applesauce, cinnamon, cloves, fennel, garlic, ginger, mint, onion, sage, savory, wine Poultry: Basil, bay leaf, bell pepper, cinnamon, curry powder, garlic, lemon juice, mace, marjoram, mushrooms,…

Chicken Casserole

Chicken Casserole Here’s a nice, warming chicken and vegetable casserole that’s a meal in itself.Serve with some extra vegetables if you like.      Serves 4 4 skinless, boneless chicken breasts 1/4 cup flour Freshly ground black pepper 1 tbsp oregano/mixed Italian herbs 1 tbsp olive oil 1 medium yellow onion, finely chopped 1 stick celery, sliced 8 ounces baby carrots 8 ounces mushrooms, sliced (optional) 1 large potato, cut into 1-inch chunks 1 1/2 cups fat-free, low sodium chicken broth 1/2 cup white wine Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 60 minutes Total Time: 75 minutes Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Coat chicken breasts in a mix of flour, black pepper and Italian herbs. Heat oil on medium high in a large Dutch oven. Brown both sides of chicken breasts, then remove and set aside. Add onion, celery, carrots, mushrooms and potatoes and 1-2 tablespoons of the chicken broth. Sauté vegetables…